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Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- [indiscernible] >> with respect to india, he believes india is a very important player. he had very productive discussions. india plays a very important role and we look to deepen our relationship with the government of india. deputy secretary carter's efforts to look at streamlining sales between the two countries. india is a key player in the region than we look forward to build a stronger defense relationship. >> is he looking to reduce the bureaucratic hurdles between india and the u.s.? has this been going on for three or four months on that issue? >> he has been active and engaged on this issue. i do not know a specific report, but i will assure you he is working this matter very hard. let me get to louis. >> he recently had been shopping with a number of countries like australia or france, canada. since the u.s.-india deal had not gone through and indians are still waiting to get their energy, my question is, the secretary is pushing for this p.o., and we are in the second term also? >> which specific deal? >> the nuclear deal. >> we are looking at the entire u.s.-india and defense rela
so long as done consistently. that's perfectly all right. one system i like is in place in india all passengers get a full manual pat down in a curtain booth by a member of the same-sex who is clearly trained to be courteous and respectful. private stores or other organizations who feel that the bulky clothing is a theft whether of shoplifting or terrorism could substitute a rule banning floor-length coats. they could have a body scanner the the door. but they don't presumably preferring customer friendliness to the extra margin of safety. what i want to establish is the discrimination inherent in the belief that it poses a unique security risk. reasonable security policy apply to similar cases are perfectly fine. a reasonable demand would be that a muslim womb -- woman have a full face photograph with suitable protection for modest i did during the photosession such a photoshould be required and most islamic scholars grow. i don't think it would be incompatible with equal liberty. however, we also know by now that the face is a very bad identifier. at immigration check point bs, eye
of china and india. that is hurting exports and pricing power for potash and phosphates. >>> the fiscal cliff is a solveable problem, that is what treasury secretary tim geithner said at "the wall street journal" ceo conference but he did not predict whether policymakers will avoid falling off the cliff by year's end. geithner said he will play a valuable role until around the inauguration. that is the fox business, giving you the power to prosper david: conventional wisdom holds that last week's elections prove that the tea party is dead and anti-business forces now rule the land. but tell that to the unions in michigan who just lost a huge bid to increase their power in the state. after spending tens of millions of dollars trying to outlaw the kind of right to work laws found in wisconsin and indiana and other places, unions lost their referendum to change the michigan state constitution by an overwhelming vote of 58 to 42%. so does the tea party message of limited government still have resonance at the local level? joining us now is the director of labor policy for the mackinaw cente
broken into and the thieves tossed it. the owner is in india. >>> san diego inmate will be the first one released under california's revised "three strikes" law. the voter-approved amendment requires the third strike to be a violent felony in order to mandate a life sentence. the 62-year-old man being released was serving 25 years to life for a third nonviolent offense. a judge reduced his sentence wednesday after 15 years behind bars. the inmate should be released in the next few days. >>> developing news now it's the first violence since israel and hamas agreed to a cease- fire. israeli troops killed a palestinian man today along its border with gaza. nine others were wounded. it appears to be an isolated incident. otherwise, things are slowly returning to normal in the region now that the truce ended eight days of intense fighting. as part of the truce, two border crossings are now open again. but despite the relative peace, one israeli commander warns his troops are ready if needed. >> gaza will be a quiet place. if the terror organization will reoperate from gaza, the future is wors
. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guys use. ishares. 9 out of 10 large, professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. introducing the ishares core, etfs for the heart of your portfolio. tax efficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>
indefinitely. >> it is injected into the vas-deference. >> they say it was discovered by a scientist in india who was studying water filtration. when injected into this tube with an activating agent, the polymer solidifies into a plug. a liquid containing lead powder passes thrie the microscopic pores, but the lead is filtered out. they say the concept is the same in the body. >> it is almost like a swiss cheese structure or a sponge-like structure. so fluid can get through and there is not back pressure which is really nice compared to a vasectomy, but the sperm are too big to make it through. >> the doctor makes an insession and injects the cell into the vas-deference where it adheres to the tissue. it amounts to a no ?ip vasectomy and takes less than an hour. 100% success rate was found when the procedure was done correctly. in the u.s. testing for vasel gel is still in animal models. the fda has not yet approved it. since the polymer can be injected with a second chemical they are hoping to market it as a far easier reversible option for younger men who may want to have children later in
bursting with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guys use. ishares. 9 out of 10 large, professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. introducing the ishares core, etfs for the heart of your portfolio. tax efficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. chubby checker: hi, i'm chubby checker. a new twist in the law makes it easier than ever to save on your medicare prescription drug plan costs. so what are you waiting for? go to www.socialsecurity.gov and apply for extra help. it's easier than learning the twist. >> president barack obama: mitt romney... no, no, no. don't boo. v
from europe, more from asia, south asia, india, pakistan, from the far east, the asian pacific. this is getting to be more like the world. >> i think part of the tea party reaction, the give our country back or take our country back, is a reflection of people's paranoia about the changing composition of the country. we're going to become a majority nonwhite nation. white men are now only 33% of the electorate, and that's the heart of republican strength. what's happened in the election is you had a gender chasm, an african-american chasm, you had a hispanic chasm, you had a chasm with young voters, and republicans can't win the white house under those circumstances. i think they're going to have to rethink this. now, democrats, chris, you remember we had to rethink how we did things and how we reached out -- >> i'm thinking about -- let me give this to john. let me ask you a question, john, about this. we're doing this very ethnically and to me a little uncomfortable but it is the world we have to look at politically. i don't like talking about race. we're all in the same race.
with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guys use. ishares. 9 out of 10 large, professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. introducing the ishares core, etfs for the heart of your portfolio. tax efficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. prand you're seeing that rightno quit in amnow.a... over five million new jobs. exports up forty one percent. home values... rising. our auto industry... back. and our heroes are coming home. we're not there yet, but we've made real progress and the... last thing we should do is turn back now. here's my plan for the next four years: making educat
of facebook. >> the average new facebook user is in india or indonesia or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access facebook because they have not had access to a broad band connection. in a lot of cases there is not an infrastructure media of communications you have in the u.s. and lot of americans will leave me and say facebook is great for gossiping and to see what my friends are in for lunch, but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story -- facebook was providing access to news, people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get out otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company -- thanksgiving day on c-span. at 2:00 -- 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nash at -- nasa officials pay amash to the first man to walk on the moon, neil armstrong. >> federer reserve chairman ben bernanke is in washington to negotiate a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal clef. well spea
.s. gdp grow at 2% this year. the world's gdp, the brick countries, brazil, russia, india and china are growing 3 and 4 times. >> let me ask you this, a lot of people look at the money that they have left over trying to save. i think the biggest seems overwhelming cause you are told to have a savings account and contribute to the 401 k. how do you know how much to put where i guess? >> you know, there are rules of thumb to live by. my oldest daughter just graduated from college and she was do i participate in a retirement plan? and i told her save 10%. give 10% away and live 80% of your live with the remaining funds. if you follow that for a life time, you'll be financially healthy whether you are a missionary, a teacher. but you need to have that mental discipline. whether you like to spend your money sailing or traveling. >> okay. thank you so much. clark kendall for coming in. we appreciate it. >> i enjoy being here. thanks. >> 8:22. 53 degrees. coming up next, getting in the holiday spirit with what's new this thanksgiving and christmas. and later, the incredible egg. check in
carolina was the only that -- battleground state. >> india was not even contested this time. north carolina was the only one. >> florida is still out. this year turned out to be irrelevant as opposed to other years. what did the republicans miss when they were looking at this electric? >> bemis anybody, practically anybody who was brown or black. bemis practically anybody who believes that immigration is an issue that needs to be tackled. you had a case here where the republican party right now is stampeding toward irrelevance. if they do not catch up with everything in the national journal, there is changing demographics. you cannot have a ruling coalition that is virtually all white. you had president obama yesterday put together this new ascendant coalition, put it back together from 2008 and enough of the democratic coalition so you have this combination of hispanics, more than 70% of hispanics, young voters, people who both want to twice as a democrat. they're likely to remain a dealt crack -- democrat. republicans, what they're missing is the idea of trying to expand their percentage
. after all it's less expensive to live in india where the stars of the movie end up going. i'm here to talk about an at native to youth nation i can't or out sourcing what soon will be a quarter of the population and to argue that the solution to much that ails us as individuals and as a society lace in rethinking the map of life. a map of life that was in many ways set up for three score and ten for those who seem like longer lives of the past century but is inadequate of five score life spans that more people will be living in the 21st century. half of the kids in the developed rgp world are projected to see their 100th birthday. so we can't just extend this life course that was set up for a very different ark of life to one that is really -- has an extra decimal point and and extra 0 to it. so i think what is happening is today that the nature of life is under every bit as radical a transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we're so familiar with. and that the period that's been characterized in these terms is actually an entirely new stage of life. 60 is not the
in places like china and india. the sooner we can have substitute fuels -- in the immediate future that is natural gas. we have to be careful how it is extracted, and it can be extracted safely. it can be an enormous advantage to us. i was on a bus in portland that was powered by compressed natural gas. we can use it to power electric vehicles. there should be a parallel track developing renewables to be there when the gas it runs out or demand increases to the point where the price goes up. to power your vehicle on natural gas is the equivalent of $2 a gallon. it will be the same with home heating. getting off of oil should be the number one priority. >> senator dill? >> thank you. gas prices are a challenge to anyone in maine trying to take their kids to school or get groceries or go to work. i support the fuel efficiency standards that will lead to automobiles to rely on less fuel and will cost families less money. i am the only candidate in the race who opposes the keystone pipeline. i do not believe transporting tar sands is the way to get off of oil. i am opposed to fracking.
the site. groups that did not have much online activity -- india is a great example. immense numbers of victories in india, particularly around corruption campaigns. individual officers requesting bribes are being exposed and given censure. the magnitude of needed improvement of justice is much greater internationally than in the united states. >> do you capture information from people? >> at most, the post code or zip code. then, we are able to target people. >> do you find somebody else who wants to do an environmental petition? >> just like with amazon, if someone is interested, we personalize recommendations for campaigns. >> do the campaigns buy that from you? >> no. people can pay to sponsor campaigns. if you are featured on the site, it is a sponsored petition. >> we see you you signed petitions on recycling. here is one that might be interesting. >> absolutely. >> have you discovered a class of people that are habitual? who has signed the most petitions? >> thousands. some people go crazy. the increase in likelihood of signing a petition is after experiencing a victory. histo
, an armed supplier, trading partner with india. the russians answer to the f-35 is the t-50 and the russians are selling the t-50 to india. russia doesn't want to renew the 1990cto, the cooperative threat reduction program, an american financed program. they don't trust america anymore saying america shouldn't tell other countries what their moral values should be when newspaper stories prove we're lacking miranda rule values here in the united states. we have a real big problem going on worldwide, and we just have to completely stop and get into peace negotiations and talk about whose trading partners with who. >> the bills were reform, and none of those directly affect foreign policy because, i believe, that we need to clean house and tend to our own problems before we stick our nose into other people's problems, and the only thick that directly affects the war in syria is that you would have to obey the constitution as originally intended and amended and require congress to declare war on any country where we commit troops. >> getting back to the issue of jobs, f-35, and senator sanders t
and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential lecktorts. and the comments i made were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential election. you had latinos turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the fir
. host: that was india in illinois. this is rolando in the brothels, texas. good morning. calling at an independent. i registered as a democrat, but i am an independent. the american people did the right thing. the american people rejected the idea that our government could only focus on the large and gritty corporations. -- agreed corporations. those corporations ship those jobs out of the united states and they just want a tax cut helping them. i think americans rejected the notion and also the idea that we can have responsible capitalism. capitalism is great, but we also need the social safety net that is provided for us just just ine capitalism runs rampant and leaves us at the wayside. i think the american people did the right thing. whites, blacks, latinos, the agents -- asians, they are educated and they are down. and for everybody that things latinos are just about immigration, nokomis we are working class. -- no, we are working class. we are teachers, businessmen, entrepreneurs. we care about this nation more than anyone -- more than anything else as well. we want the nat
in a box. it was not china, it would be india and countries in africa. it already is making products that are either american in concept or are just completely international products. host: scott, let me add this to the mix -- the reporter notes that this will presumably not be much appreciated by beijing. guest: burma is a place that china perceives as in its sphere of influence. particularly as a place to get the resources it needs. timber along the borders, oil. there has been a backlash inside burma which is why we saw political reform their last year which is the reason the president is going, against china. in the way it treats burma as it basically its backyard forest to cut down. point, the caller's every product that he described there would be a lot more expensive if not for china. he touches on some very important which was the implications of what nafta meant and what globalization more broadly means when it not well articulated by president clinton or subsequent presidents. president bush wanted a hemisphere-wide free trade summit. it is very dislocated, particularly on
, it would be india and countries in africa. it already is making products that are either american in concept or are just completely international products. host: scott, let me add this to the mix -- the reporter notes that this will presumably not be much appreciated by beijing. guest: burma is a place that china perceives as in its sphere of influence. particularly as a place to get the resources it needs. timber along the borders, oil. there has been a backlash inside burma which is why we saw political reform their last year which is the reason the president is going, against china. in the way it treats burma as basically its backyard forest to cut down. back to the caller's point, every product that he described there would be a lot more expensive if not for china. he touches on some very important which was the implications of what nafta meant and what globalization more broadly means when it not well articulated by president clinton or subsequent presidents. president bush wanted a hemisphere-wide free trade summit. it is very dislocated, particularly on american manufacturi
foreign competition in china and india getting ahead of us. is the model we have in place for teaching our kids that was built in the industrial age sufficient for the information age? is the curriculum in place sufficient for the 21st century to develop new businesses to bring the economy forward? >> that is a softball question. [laughter] no. when we built as education system, summers were also taken work on farms. it was a compromise with farmers. that is why we have the schedule. when we put that system in place, there were no cars, planes, were electric lights. computers, on and on. the bottom line is we have an over allegiance to the system based on the stock to a. -- based on nostalgia. my mother went to the school. my grandmother went to the school. you cannot close the school. 95% students were failing and parents were still fighting for the school. i ask them and they said, my grandmother went to the school. i would say, the grandmother passed? your kids are not passing. [laughter] i believe in sentimentality, nostalgic, and preserving neighborhood icons. if you are failing 95% o
's the long-term when you think about it. you look at some of the work that is happening in india, for example, to try to attract foreign direct investment, to try to attract more entrepreneur, i'm not sure it's still very early in term of the result. i think for the last three decades, the u.s. has had, you know, historically a very healthy immigration pots -- policy, but in the last decade or so, we have gone the other way. when you think about the number of immigrants that come in and build amazing companies, and created jobs, you know, in the hundreds of thousands, we can't be looking at other markets because i don't think there's the perfect model. i think we need to look back at what was happening in the 1970s. in term of the u.s. in the historical model. we did encourage a lot of immigration. a lot of people came in with science, technology, mathematics background. you look at silicon valley, you see the fruit of a lot of that. >> you had a comment? >> i spent seven years of my life painfully as a member of the commission on immigration reform, which was chairmaned by bosch are a jordan
the dropout rate? >> you talk about foreign competition in china and india getting ahead of us. is the model we have in place for teaching our kids that was built in the industrial age sufficient for the information age? >> that is a softball question. [laughter] >> realisticalno. when we built as education system, summers were also taken work on farms. that is why we have the schedule. when we put that system in place, there were no cars, planes, were electric lights. computers, on and on. we have anline is over allegiance to the system based on the stock to a. my mother went to the school. my grandmother went to the school. you cannot close the school. 95% students were failing and parents were still fighting for the school. i ask them and they said, my grandmother went to the school. i would say, the grandmother passed? your kids are not passing. [laughter] if you are failing 95% of the kids in the school, either you are going to change or we are going to shut you down. we should be consistent. it does not matter what kind of school it is. shut down the bad charter schools. we put this mo
a future where new communications technologies will tie together indiana and india, chicago and the condo. that speech was inspirational to me when i first read it 20 years ago. the core messages from that speech are as relevant today as they were 50 years ago. the difference is the primary new communications technology today is different. it is not broadcast tv or cable tv or satellites. it is broadband internet. let's start with the opportunities around broadband internet. it is extraordinary. we see it here at home in the u.s. and it is no exaggeration to say high speed internet is reshaping the economy. we can hardly at imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, wikipedia. the app stores, people are using to download 100 apps a day. it is revolutionizing health care with remote monitoring, remote diagnostics and digital records, education, health care energy, public safety, a government performance, elections. it is already a game changer, and we are still in the early innings of this communications technology. these opportunities, where we are in the curve of the technologies
watched around the globe tonight. as we said earlier, countries from mexico to britain, to india, to brazil, china is watching every move. how many people have they designated to watch everything happening in this country tonight. and we got a wonderful tweet on why tonight matters because somebody says, "my grandparents made sure i would always be free because the whole world is watching." >> and we are getting more signs that every vote matters, diane. in the state of florida, where else, you look at 78% of the vote in right now. i want to show the map right there. and look at the margin between president obama and governor romney right there. let's put that back up right there. it's just about a little over 1,000 votes. 2,000 votes separate them right now, 50/50 down the middle. with 70% of the vote in. i want to go to abc's cecilia vega covering that for us. cecilia, you're in the heart of it, tampa, that is the microcosm of that state right there. >> yeah, literally, george, millions of votes up for grabs. the university of florida. a polling place, watching students vote al
was instrumental in opening up our opening of our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the diplomat warrior what we most admire in our uniform, and our combat commander. i want to say thank you to bill, for you, for doing this, and let's turn this over to you. [applause] >> first big step. doctor, think you're much and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we are getting settled here, have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs in order to serve. and for those of you that missed the chat line, it may be too late. [laughter] but then again, i don't think too many in israel are starting. not the same can be said for others in the world. i wanted to begin with first in case you missed the copies of this on the way in, recommended to your reading and perusal and safety john and steve, thanks for inviting me to participate here in this event. i never get into that in a minute what i think is really important. i'd also like to add my voice to the memory of trip to sell, who contributed as he did it so may things, to this effort just befor
technologies will tie together, and these are quotes, tied together indiana and india, chicago and the congo. that speech, newton minow's insights, were inspirational to me when i first read them 20 years ago. and the fact is they helped inform today how the fcc thinks about new communications technologies. because the core messages from the speech are as motivated as they were 50 years ago. i mean, any difference of course is -- [inaudible] satellites. it's broadband internet. so let's start with the opportunities around broadband internet. the benefits already been delivered by wired and wireless broadband are nothing short of extraordinary. we see it here at home in the u.s. is no exaggeration to say the high speed reshaping the u.s. economy. we can hardly imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, amazon, wikipedia, without e-mail, texting, or the apple stores people are using to download 100 million apps at a. broadband has also transforming education, enabling learning and interactive digital textbooks. it's revolutionizing health care with remote monitoring, remote diagnostics
here. oh, i'm sorry. yes. >> you talked about foreign competition in china, india, those places kind of getting ahead of us. is the model that we have in place for teaching our kids that was built in the agricultural age really sufficient for the information age? is the curriculum we have in place sufficient to allow them to be inknowers and entrepreneurs? >> now, that's a softball question. [laughter] no, but realistically, you know, i'm trying not to jump out of my shoes on that. look, no. i mean, when we built this educational system, the '93 model, you know, we ended it artificially because of the compromise with farmers so kids could get out of school in enough time to work in farming. summers were off so they could work on the farm. that was why we had that agricultural schedule. when we put that system in place, there were no cars, certainly no planes, there weren't even electric lights. and computers? okay, well, on and on and on. and can the bottom line is we have -- and the bottom line is we have this overallegiance to that system based on nostalgia, you know? so many peopl
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)